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Say It Right Series

Jimin, Helen and Andrew Discussion

Posted by arei October 8, 2008 in the Group General Discussion.

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Hello Helen and Jimin,

 

I will be discussing the first five (5) dialogues and will dabble in the last three (3) tomorrow. Jimin you have comprehensively outlined the dialogues and have raised some interesting insights into the relationship (or lack thereof) between Zhang Liang and Lili [Surname]. In regards to our actual play, hopefully you guys received my email about availability and practice? Anyway lets get on with it…

 

The Other Woman

 

This dialogue provides a wonderful insight into the vastly different relationship between boyfriend and girlfriend in Chinese culture. An interesting character use was “” in the answering machines recording. As stated by the podcasters, this adds a level of formality to the sentence. We see Zhang Liang, as you pointed out Jimin, defending himself saying he is with a whole group of 一大帮同事 which is of course one big ‘group’ of workmates. Before this dialogue I would have guessed this to mean “one big helpful group of workmates” but we are introduced to a new ‘grouping word’ (?) or it is possibly a measure word? Another interesting opener spoken by Lili is “怪不得” which one may get all confused about, ‘don’t blame get’, ‘blame + potential complement X2’… not really sure … but Jenny from ChinesePod points out it literally means “不奇怪” or something we learnt in class “难怪”, hopefully this structure will be explained because I am not sure if I came across a similar pattern I would understand it. Zhang Liang pushes the point stressing the need to 别误会 which literally translates to ‘Don’t mistake possible’ or ‘don’t be mistaken’ or ‘misunderstand’. A use of which I don’t think I and maybe other students are very confident with is the ‘change of status’ use; which we see used in “你别解释”, ‘le’ means ‘change your status from 解释’ing to not explaining. A question I have is the last sentence and last clause spoken by Lili, “你们男人都一个样”, what purpose does the ‘’ serve, it seems to be to be optional, perhaps its for emphasis?

 

Jimin I think you were right that Lili just did not listen, which is quite unreasonable, I guess we can safely say that你们女人都一个样!

 

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Confiding in a Conniving Friend

 

Jimin you said that Lili wants go find a new man to love her more whilst this is true I don’t think it does her sentence justice. Lili says she want 全心全意爱她的人, totally reasonable and pretty much what you said. But I think there is more meaning that someone who loves her. The colour with which she speaks, to me sounds like a man [like LiuXiang, but let’s not get ahead of ourselves] who cannot part from her hip.

 

Moving on. I didn’t mention in last dialogue, but this dialogue gives use the second use of the . Last dialogue we saw the use as ‘for the purpose of’ [忙着跟女同事。。] but this dialogue we see the use to describe a physical action “背着我” which describes the physical (even though it is metaphorical) nature of Zhang Liang’s actions. I find it interesting that Lili is getting such good advice from this old friend of Zhang Liang’s, they really didn’t hit it off last series at the restaurant, I must say her advice is fair if not conservative, considering she once seemed to see some 分手 action. Notably, a character very similar to 着,看, is used in a new way. It describes a thought, I believe you ccan replace this character with a 以为 which would perhaps provide a little bit too much information, as it might suggest that this supposed ‘conniving friend’ already believes Lili. Another use of the which I don’t understand in 笑个不停, unnecessary I believe, unless it adds colour, I want colour I suppose.

 

BEAT EMOTION CURSE PLAYFULNESS, personally on first glance I would have translated it to, hit emotion scold sticky rice dumplings, but that’s because I didn’t know the last character. I think this is a fantastic way to describe flirting and courting. Another Chengyu 成语 employed by those craft ChinesePodders is 做贼心虚 doing ‘nervous’ like a thief. So I suppose Lili is complaining about Zhang Liang saying he had the look of guilt on his face that was likened to a thief that has been caught.

 

Oh and just quickly, 不管。。。都/. Just as we learnt in class this week, this expression is replaceable with the structure 无论。。。都/.

 

 

[more to come 等一下]

 

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